thenextrevolution:

A terrifying truth. From Wipeout Homophobia on Facebook

thenextrevolution:

A terrifying truth. From Wipeout Homophobia on Facebook

Nothing Endures. So Enjoy.: So this is an e-mail I wrote to a British Christian Organisation...

paintwithyourbrain:

So this is an e-mail I wrote to a British Christian Organisation (C.A.R.E) offering the opportunity to change your sexuality through prayer:


Dear Sir/Madam

I would first of all like to thank you for offering ’Ex-Gay’ and homosexual-curing therapy. It is fantastic to see people doing such…

(Source: fascistlittlepanties)

The Pity Committee: 70 Percent of Anti-LGBTQ Murder Victims Are People of Color

pityplease:

via ColorLines:

The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs releasedits annual report on hate violence motivated by sexual orientation, gender identity and expression and HIV status last week. The report documents 27 anti-LGBT murders in 2010, which is the second highest annual total…

(via bijunn-deactivated20130612)

It must be awful, being a homophobe. Having to spend all that time obsessing about what gay people might be doing with their genitals. Seeing it in your mind, over and over again, in high-definition close-up. Bravely you masturbate, to make the pictures go away, but to no avail. They’re seared onto your mental membranes. Every time you close your eyes, an imaginary gay man’s imaginary penis rises from the murk, bowing ominously in your direction, sensing your discomfort. Laughing. Mocking. Possibly even winking. How dare they, this man and his penis? How dare they do this to you?

Obviously you can’t fight the big gay penis in your head. It has no physical form, so you can’t get a grip on it, much as you’d like to. You’d love to grab it and throttle it until it splutters its last. That might bring you closure. But no. So you do the next best thing. You condemn homosexuals in the real world. Maybe if they could just stop all this “being gay” business for 10 minutes, you’d get some respite from that scary headcock. It might shrivel away completely, leaving nothing behind. Except maybe a nice bit of bum.

No, dammit! Forget I said that! No bum either!

— Charlie Brooker (via insideonemind)

(Source: Guardian, via insideonemind)

occupyallstreets:

Boston Police Investigating Officer’s For Choking A Gay Protester
Boston Police is investigating its officers’ response to rowdy duel protests at the Boston Common on Sunday, Tax Day, after a photo surfaced showing “a city officer with his hand around a protester’s neck.” As Daily Kos’ Scott Wooledge reports, the Tea Party-organized event was co-sponsored by the vehemently anti-gay MassResistance and featured Scott Lively, “professional worldwide hunter of homosexuals and top proponent of ‘gay cure’” and a proponent of Uganda’s infamous ‘kill gays’ legislation.
As counter-protesters — including Occupy Boston Queer and Trans Direct Action Working Group — expressed their opposition to Lively’s participation, one of the speakers said from the podium, broadcast across the loud speakers at the Commons, “We will not be silenced by faggots.” Read a first-hand account from the protester roughed up in the picture at Back2Stonewall.
Source

occupyallstreets:

Boston Police Investigating Officer’s For Choking A Gay Protester

Boston Police is investigating its officers’ response to rowdy duel protests at the Boston Common on Sunday, Tax Day, after a photo surfaced showing “a city officer with his hand around a protester’s neck.” As Daily Kos’ Scott Wooledge reports, the Tea Party-organized event was co-sponsored by the vehemently anti-gay MassResistance and featured Scott Lively, “professional worldwide hunter of homosexuals and top proponent of ‘gay cure’” and a proponent of Uganda’s infamous ‘kill gays’ legislation.

As counter-protesters — including Occupy Boston Queer and Trans Direct Action Working Group — expressed their opposition to Lively’s participation, one of the speakers said from the podium, broadcast across the loud speakers at the Commons, “We will not be silenced by faggots.” Read a first-hand account from the protester roughed up in the picture at Back2Stonewall.

Source

(via anarcho-queer)

Fighting Erasure: Homophobia.

fighting-erasure:

I don’t understand why some people are really homophobic. Being gay doesn’t mean you’re not a good person. It also doesn’t say anything about what you like doing or how you like living. Before I came out as gay, it was like I was this perfect overachieving school-going Mary Sue who was always…

commiepinkofag:

Halifax gay rights activist beaten to death outside bar
Photo: Activist Raymond Taavel

A well-known gay rights activist in Halifax is dead after being beaten as he was leaving a popular gay bar Monday night. Raymond Taavel intervened when a man he was with began arguing with another man, who was yelling at the pair as they left Menz Bar. Witnesses said the man was yelling homophobic slurs…
Police called in search dogs after a witness reported that the man fled the scene. The suspect was found in an alley, around the corner from where Taavel was killed.
CTV Atlantic identified the suspect as 32-year-old Andre Noel Denny. He faces a charge of second-degree murder and is expected to appear in Halifax provincial court on Wednesday.
Police said they had been looking for the suspect earlier, because he had failed to return to the East Coast Forensic Centre following a one-hour leave.
“We had officers that had gone out and were looking for him,” Const. Brian Palmeter told CTV. “Unfortunately we didn’t locate him until after the assault took place.”
Taavel’s death has put Halifax’s gay community on edge.
“I certainly think that people are going to continue to exercise caution and be looking out for their personal safety,” Kevin Kindred of the Nova Scotia Rainbow Action Project told CTV. “On the other hand, it’s also, a lot of people talking today about reclaiming our right to feel safe on the street.”
Heeding that message, friends of the 49-year-old activist took to Gottingen Street to reclaim the heart of the city’s gay community.
Mourners hung rainbow flags, a symbol of gay pride, along the street.
NDP MP Megan Leslie said Taavel’s death was “very, very sad news.”
“He was a great member of our community, and he was a friend of mine and a friend of my team,” Leslie told CTV.
Friends were to hold a candlelight vigil outside Menz Bar to honour Taavel.
Meanwhile, officials are looking into why the suspect was granted a pass from the East Coast Forensic Centre.

commiepinkofag:

Halifax gay rights activist beaten to death outside bar

Photo: Activist Raymond Taavel

A well-known gay rights activist in Halifax is dead after being beaten as he was leaving a popular gay bar Monday night. Raymond Taavel intervened when a man he was with began arguing with another man, who was yelling at the pair as they left Menz Bar. Witnesses said the man was yelling homophobic slurs…

Police called in search dogs after a witness reported that the man fled the scene. The suspect was found in an alley, around the corner from where Taavel was killed.

CTV Atlantic identified the suspect as 32-year-old Andre Noel Denny. He faces a charge of second-degree murder and is expected to appear in Halifax provincial court on Wednesday.

Police said they had been looking for the suspect earlier, because he had failed to return to the East Coast Forensic Centre following a one-hour leave.

“We had officers that had gone out and were looking for him,” Const. Brian Palmeter told CTV. “Unfortunately we didn’t locate him until after the assault took place.”

Taavel’s death has put Halifax’s gay community on edge.

“I certainly think that people are going to continue to exercise caution and be looking out for their personal safety,” Kevin Kindred of the Nova Scotia Rainbow Action Project told CTV. “On the other hand, it’s also, a lot of people talking today about reclaiming our right to feel safe on the street.”

Heeding that message, friends of the 49-year-old activist took to Gottingen Street to reclaim the heart of the city’s gay community.

Mourners hung rainbow flags, a symbol of gay pride, along the street.

NDP MP Megan Leslie said Taavel’s death was “very, very sad news.”

“He was a great member of our community, and he was a friend of mine and a friend of my team,” Leslie told CTV.

Friends were to hold a candlelight vigil outside Menz Bar to honour Taavel.

Meanwhile, officials are looking into why the suspect was granted a pass from the East Coast Forensic Centre.

(via commiepinkofag)

Many gay actors still fear coming out will damage their careers

When Antony Sher started acting with the pioneering Gay Sweatshop theatre company in the 70s, he managed to stay in the closet. “I look back and blush,” he said. “We all agreed to do it on the basis that it was stated that not all the performers were gay so you didn’t know who was and who wasn’t.

“Then, in the mid-80s, when I did the British premiere of Harvey Fierstein’s Torch Song Trilogy, I still wasn’t out. I was doing press interviews about this great gay play that I felt so strongly about for a specific reason and I wasn’t saying it – it was an astonishing waste of energy. But that’s the kind of tangle you get into if you’re not out.”

Sher finally came out in 1990, inspired by the example of Ian McKellen and Simon Callow. Yet, more than two decades on, despite strides in gay equality and the entertainment industry’s liberal reputation, many gay actors still fear that being open about their sexuality will damage their careers.

Though there is a highly visible younger generation of gay actors, from Being Human’s Russell Tovey to Coronation Street’s Charlie Condou and Jeremy Sheffield, a recent survey by the actors’ union Equity revealed that only 57% of gay actors felt they could be open about their sexuality with their agents. A third had experienced homophobia in the workplace, 57% saying it had come from other performers.

In 2006, the actor Chris New, who starred in the film Weekend last year, was advised by his agent not to talk about being gay, despite starring at the time in Bent, Martin Sherman’s play about the persecution of gay people in Nazi Germany.

Now Equity has enlisted several well-known actors to lend their names toa campaign supporting gay actors who choose to come out. “It’s about giving members the confidence to come out and if they do, that we’ll be there to offer them support,” said Max Beckmann, Equity’s equalities officer.

“If actors experience homophobic bullying we would be able to raise that with the employer or if there was a case of member discrimination we would offer them legal assistance.”

Sher, whose civil partner, Gregory Doran, was recently appointed creative director of the Royal Shakespeare Company, said that British theatre was generally “very grown up. I don’t think theatre audiences really care about people’s sexuality”. However, he said that being gay was still an issue in TV and particularly in what he called “homophobic Hollywood”.

New said he knew of a fellow gay actor “who’s in LA and making films, and he’s taking very visible steps to go back in the closet. A lot of people have warned me about being out in America. They say: ‘Maybe you should back off from playing too many gay roles’ and ‘Don’t do too much gay press’.”

Sher said that Hollywood was reluctant to give roles to out gay actors, because it was trying to get the biggest possible mainstream audience. “Test audiences are midwestern, very conservative people, so it’s possible that those kinds of people would be uncomfortable watching a gay man play a sex scene with a woman or whatever. But the world is changing, so that audience is going to change as well.”

He agreed with the time-honoured belief of gay campaigners that coming out is the only way to change things. “If everybody came out of the closet, [being gay] would cease to be an issue because there would be so many of us. Ian McKellen is the first out actor to be nominated for an Oscar – when people start doing things like that then things change.

“Role models are terribly important. I speak as one who grew up in apartheid South Africa where it was not just illegal but it was like the most disgusting, criminal thing you could possibly be doing. It would have been transforming as a teenager to have seen people like Ian McKellen and my own partner, Greg, being talked about on their merits and not on their sexuality.”

Sophie Ward, one of the few out gay female actors, agreed that sexuality would only stop being an issue when out gay actors became so commonplace they no longer attracted any special attention. “Actors don’t want it to be the first thing they have to discuss every time they talk about their career,” she said. “But it will always be an issue until everybody feels comfortable coming out – it’s a circular argument.”

Clearly, not all actors share this view. In 2009, Rupert Everett said that coming out 20 years earlier had damaged his career. “It’s not that advisable to be honest,” he said. “I would not advise any actor necessarily, if he was really thinking of his career, to come out.”

Sher said: “I’m sorry if that’s the case for him, but he seems to have had quite a big career out of playing outrageous and camp characters. He hasn’t done badly, has he?”

Though New was recently turned down for the role of Jesus on a US TV show, and suspects it was because he is gay, he said that actors should not blame homophobia for not getting cast in the roles they want.

“There could be a million reasons why you might not get a job and gay people have to be careful about blaming [homophobia], because they’re reinforcing their own closet door.

“First, there’s nothing you can do about it except wait for people’s opinions to change, which they do. There are a lot of actors I know who are black who constantly say: ‘I need to go to America because I don’t get any jobs over here.’ Most of these people, usually, are having quite nice careers. It can become an obsession.”

New said that rather than become obsessed with not landing heterosexual romantic leads, he was relaxed about playing gay roles. “I have played quite a few gay roles but they’ve been really good. Weekend is a really good gay role. Bent is incredible. Obviously I do get sent scripts which have pretty rubbish gay roles. All you can do is say yes to the things you want to do and no to the things you don’t.”

He added that actors pay a heavy personal price for staying in the closet. “Let’s say you were dating an actor who was in the closet. It would be a very bad thing to be able to say: ‘Oh, I’m dating this guy but I’m not allowed to say who it is.’ That’d be a bit of an ugly world to live in. There are quite a few actors who are in the closet who I just challenge. They usually um and ah and say: ‘You don’t understand.’ First, why would anybody be that interested – it’s kind of vanity to think that anybody would. And second, just get on with it and stop lying about yourself.”

Malcolm Sinclair, Equity’s president, said that coming out would have a positive impact on actors’ work: “Acting at its finest is about telling the truth, so being honest about yourself is always going to benefit your craft.”

Sher concurs. “When you see any great performer, you sort of see into that person’s soul,” he said. “Your sexuality is profoundly a part of who you are. I think it’s very difficult to really reveal yourself in that exquisite way if you’re trying to hide part of yourself.”

(Source: moviemakersunited)

transradical:

The “Chevalier D’Eon,” a 18th-century painting of a cross-dressing man, who may have identified as female at one point, recently sold to a British gallery.The painting, by Thomas Stewart, depicts Chevalier D’Eon, who apparently lived quite a life of intrigue as a British-based employee of King Louis XV’s secret service. It’s believed D’Eon began dressing as a woman to evade capture after betraying the French government, eventually identifying as a woman until dying in 1810.It was only recently revealed, thanks to restoration, that the Stewart painting portrayed [someone biologically male] in women’s clothing, instead of simply a [cisgender] woman. Ever since the British National Portraits Gallery purchased the painting from a New York dealer, the portrait has attracted much curiosity. It’s believed to be the earliest found painting of a gender-ambiguous person. Read more here. 

transradical:

The “Chevalier D’Eon,” a 18th-century painting of a cross-dressing man, who may have identified as female at one point, recently sold to a British gallery.

The painting, by Thomas Stewart, depicts Chevalier D’Eon, who apparently lived quite a life of intrigue as a British-based employee of King Louis XV’s secret service. It’s believed D’Eon began dressing as a woman to evade capture after betraying the French government, eventually identifying as a woman until dying in 1810.

It was only recently revealed, thanks to restoration, that the Stewart painting portrayed [someone biologically male] in women’s clothing, instead of simply a [cisgender] woman. Ever since the British National Portraits Gallery purchased the painting from a New York dealer, the portrait has attracted much curiosity. It’s believed to be the earliest found painting of a gender-ambiguous person. Read more here. 

CUDDLE FUDDLE by DEDDY